The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
1:24 am
Tue April 2, 2013

When You're Mixed Race, Just One Box Is Not Enough

Dave Kung with wife Sarah Tyson (left), stepson Cy Tyson-Brown and parents Sonja and George Kung.
Courtesy of Dave Kung

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 7:49 pm

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition. You can find hundreds of six-word submissions and submit your own at www.theracecardproject.com.

Read more
Financial Basics For Baby Boomers
1:23 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Deciding The Right Time To Claim Social Security

The importance of making a smart decision on how and when benefits are claimed can't be underestimated, says Mary Beth Franklin of Investment News.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 6:45 am

When it comes to claiming Social Security benefits, there is no magic age. Today's boomers can begin collecting full benefits at 66, tap in early for a modified benefit at 62 or delay receiving benefits until 70.

But the importance of making a smart decision on how and when benefits are claimed can't be underestimated, says Mary Beth Franklin of Investment News.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:23 am
Tue April 2, 2013

New Medical School Wants To Build Ranks Of Primary Care Doctors

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 11:30 am

Michael Ellison has a tough assignment. He's the associate dean of admissions choosing the first class of a brand new medical school, the Frank H. Netter School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn.

"We have over 1,600 applicants, and we will interview 400 for 60 spots," Ellison says.

The school has a very specific mission: minting doctors who want to go into primary care practice.

Read more
Law
1:22 am
Tue April 2, 2013

States Propose Crackdowns On Copper Theft

Everything from telephone wire to plumbing is a target for copper thieves, and lawmakers in nearly half the states are considering legislation aimed at making it harder to sell the stolen metal.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 6:59 am

The price of copper remains at near historic highs, and that means so, too, does the amount of copper getting stolen.

Everything from telephone wire to plumbing is a target, and lawmakers in nearly half the states are considering legislation aimed at making it harder for thieves to sell the stolen metal.

James City County in southeastern Virginia has seen a spate of recent copper thefts. Maj. Steve Rubino with the county police department says there have been six major incidents since January.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:32 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Divided Federal Appeals Court Rules In Favor Of Upstart TV Service

We told you in February about Aereo, a service that allows its users to watch TV over the Internet. As we said at the time, the service was attracting waves of lawsuits.

Read more
World
3:31 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

In Seaside Cypriot Town, Russians Of Modest Means Cry Foul

The owner of a Russian market helps customers in Limassol, Cyprus. Many middle-class Russians here say their community is being unfairly depicted as a group of money-laundering oligarchs.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 6:51 pm

Borscht and vareniki are on the menu at Taras Bulba, a restaurant named after Nikolai Gogol's Ukrainian folk hero. It's one of many Russian-owned businesses in Limassol, Cyprus.

Approximately 30,000 Russians live in this city — about a quarter of the population. There are Russian hair salons, supermarkets, schools and even a radio station.

Limassol's mayor, Andreas Christou, studied mechanical engineering in Moscow and speaks Russian fluently. He says Russians came to the city in droves after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

Read more
The Salt
3:28 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Eat Fish And Prosper?

We've all heard that eating fish is good for us. Regularly eating fish has been linked to a host of health benefits – for our hearts, our eyes, and our brains.

Read more
Economy
3:11 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Stockton Bankruptcy Case Defers Decision On Pensions

An aging sign at City Hall in Stockton, Calif. A judge has ruled that the city is eligible for federal bankruptcy protection.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 6:41 pm

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Christopher Klein ruled Monday on the most important question facing Stockton, Calif. — whether it could enter into federal bankruptcy protection.

Klein agreed that the city is, in fact, broke.

But he didn't decide the question of whether the city must renegotiate its pension obligations, as some of its creditors had hoped.

Read more

Zed began at KUFM in 1995, working on programs such as Listeners’ Bookstall, Dancing with Tradition, and Freeforms.   He was previously a broadcaster and cub reporter at college, community, commercial and public radio stations in Virginia and Australia. He is currently host and producer of Thursday Freeforms.

Beth Anne Austein has been spinning tunes on the air (The Folk Show, Dancing With Tradition, Freeforms), as well as recording, editing and mixing audio for Montana Public Radio and Montana PBS, since the Clinton Administration. She’s jockeyed faders or "fixed it in post” for The Plant Detective; Listeners Bookstall; Fieldnotes; Musicians Spotlight; The Write Question; Storycorps; Selected Shorts; Bill Raoul’s music series; orchestral and chamber concerts; lecture series; news interviews; and outside producers’ programs about topics ranging from philosophy to ticks.

Pages