NPR News

Pages

All Tech Considered
1:17 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

The Hackable Japanese Toilet Comes With An App To Track Poop

A promotion for the My Satis app.
My Satis

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 1:45 pm

Read more
It's All Politics
12:56 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

How John McCain Got His Groove Back

Sen. John McCain at a rally in Denver during his 2008 presidential campaign.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:20 pm

All of a sudden, Sen. John McCain matters again.

It's not like he disappeared. But after being sidelined for a time by his 2008 defeat in the presidential election against Barack Obama, the Arizona Republican has re-emerged as one of Obama's most important allies in the Senate.

McCain took the lead in crafting immigration legislation that passed the Senate in June. Last month, he came up with the deal that prevented the Senate from abolishing judicial filibusters, allowing several Obama Cabinet and agency nominees to win confirmation.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:55 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Ex-Turkish Military Chief Gets Life In Prison For Coup Plot

Protesters wave posters of Turkey's first president, Kemal Ataturk, before a police barricade outside the Silivri jail complex in Silivri, Turkey, on Monday. Scores of people were sentenced for their roles in what's being dubbed the Ergenekon plot.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:15 pm

Turkey's former military chief was sentenced to life in prison and scores of others were given long sentences Monday for plotting against the government of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Read more
It's All Politics
12:12 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Texas' Democratic Darling Will Decide On Governor's Race Soon

Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis speaks at a Washington, D.C., fundraiser last month.
Nick Wass AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 3:24 pm

Official Washington has fled for dog-day vacations few deserved, leaving the nation's capital a bit languid and bereft of news.

Enter, as if on cue, Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis of abortion bill filibuster fame, with a speech Monday at the National Press Club.

Read more
The Salt
12:04 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Chili Cheeseburger A-Plenty

As you approach the Beacon in Spartanburg, S.C., you see the lighthouse, which is the only light thing you're going to encounter for the next half-hour or so.
NPR

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 12:44 pm

Read more
The Two-Way
11:19 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Goodbye Earth! What Messenger Saw On Its Way To Mercury

Earth as seen by the Messenger spacecraft.
NASA

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 12:48 pm

Read more
The Two-Way
11:17 am
Mon August 5, 2013

15 Years Later, Tawana Brawley Has Paid 1 Percent Of Penalty

Tawana Brawley, with the Rev. Al Sharpton, in 1988.
Mark Elias AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 12:32 pm

It was 1987 when a black teenager, Tawana Brawley, said she had been raped and kidnapped by a group of white men in Dutchess County, N.Y.

Her story of being attacked, scrawled with racial slurs, smeared with feces and left beside a road wrapped in a plastic bag made front pages across the nation — especially after the Rev. Al Sharpton took up her case.

Read more
All Tech Considered
11:03 am
Mon August 5, 2013

The Effort To Write Laws For Your Digital Life After Death

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 12:21 pm

Time was when the belongings you left behind after death were tangible — furniture, jewelry, letters — and financial property, which hundreds of years of experience have taught executors how to handle. Today, some of the most valuable keys to our lives and identities exist digitally, and are technically owned by companies like Google or Facebook.

For the digital assets stored on shared servers in the cloud, legal systems have yet to catch up to help decide who controls your data when you're dead. And uniform laws around control of these assets could help.

Read more
Parallels
10:49 am
Mon August 5, 2013

World War II Researchers Say 'Italian Schindler' Was A Myth

The Risiera di San Sabba in Trieste was used during World War II as the only death camp on Italian soil. In the building's courtyard, the outline on the brick wall is where the crematorium was located.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:24 pm

A group of Italian researchers who have studied troves of World War II documents have found no evidence that Giovanni Palatucci, a police official long credited as the "Italian Schindler," saved the lives of 5,000 Jews.

The findings are demolishing the Italian national icon and angering supporters of the man who has been honored at Israel's Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial, and who has been put on the track to sainthood.

'Unfounded' Claims Of Heroism?

Read more
Parallels
10:28 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Why India's Next State Is Not Likely To Be The Last

Visitors ride in a carriage at the entrance of the Jewel of the Nizams "Falaknuma Palace," the former residence of Nizam Mehaboob Ali Khan in the old city area of Hyderabad. The legacy of these Muslim rulers — and the disenfranchisement of the Hindu majority — contributed to the economic gap in Andhra Pradesh.
Noah Seelam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 11:35 am

India's cartographers may soon be redrawing the country's map. If events go to plan, India will inaugurate Telangana, its 29th state, perhaps as early as next year — casting the spotlight anew on the challenges of governing a country as vast, and with a population as diverse, as India.

Telangana, on the arid Deccan plateau, is due to be carved out of the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, India's fifth most populous state, with a population of 85 million.

Read more

Pages