Photography and Poetry
6:28 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Still Here: Not Living in Tipis

Still Here: Not Living in Tipis, photographs and poetry by Sue Reynolds and Victor Charlo

San Francisco Bay-area photographer Sue Reynolds and American Indian poet Victor Charlo talk about their book, Still Here: Not Living in Tipis.

In this first collaborative photo-poetry book between a white urban photographer and a reservation Indian, Sue Reynolds' images and Salish poet Victor Charlo's poems tell a story of resurrection in the face of long odds. The book includes forty-five color photos and five Salish poems. A percentage of sales goes to American Indian College Fund.

San Francisco Bay-area photographer Sue Reynolds and American Indian poet Victor Charlo talk about their book, 'Still Here: Not Living in Tipis.'

The music in this program was written and performed by John Flordis.

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Sue Reynolds

Sue Reynolds is passionate about creating bridges of understanding between Native and non-Native peoples. Her images have appeared in exhibits in San Francisco, Montana, and Japan, and in many publications, including Cowboys & Indians, Montana Magazine, and Indian Country Today. Her photographs are in collections nationwide. She has studied with Rocky Mountain School of Photography in Missoula, Montana, holds a B.A. in Art History from University of California, Davis, and an M.B.A. from San Francisco State University. She is a fourth-generation Californian, and resides in Walnut Creek.

Victor Charlo
Credit Sue Reynolds / Sue Reynolds Photography

Victor Charlo is a member of the Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes. He is a direct descendent of the chiefs who signed the Hellgate Treaty. Born and raised on the Flathead Reservation in western Montana, Vic writes poems about reservation life and people. Vic earned degrees from the University of Montana and Gonzaga University. The proud father of four children, Vic resides in Old Agency, nar Dixon, Montana. His daughter, April, translates her father's poems into Salish.